dried-plums-or-prunes

WMDs

After expressing my concerns relating to bowel motions in yesterday’s post, one comment suggested prunes, that well known secret weapon used in hospitals around the world.

Prunes = Weapons of Mass Defecation

The good news is, that I didn’t need to resort to them. All is well and functioning normally.

The cold front arrived last night, rained for an hour at 12:30am, not hard but enough to make the night comfortable.

I can’t help but take issue with the dramatic swings in the global weather. Although typhoons in Asia are normal, that Philippines one was the worst ever recorded. I read yesterday, that the damage was exacerbated by the fact that coastal mangrove swamps that normally offer protection from typhoons had been cut down for firewood, leaving the populace defenceless.

Everything man does, has a backlash. We never learn. Those mangrove swamps were there for a purpose, a purpose designed by Mother Nature.

As the death toll rises above 5,ooo, and I feel sorry for those who died and others left homeless, it is the price paid for previous actions. Had the coastal mangrove swamps been left intact, the death toll and homeless may have been less.

I clicked on a tweeted  image this morning. It was of The Cathedral formation on the Paracas Peninsula in Peru, 260kms south of Lima. This beautiful coastal rock formation was probably the most photographed by tourists, apart from Machu Picchu scenes.

Standing on the high cliffs looking down was an awesome experience.

The Cathedral – image: Wild About Travel

Before seeing this tourists descend to the ‘back door’ and go inside the formation.

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Along the beach to the ‘back door’ – image: AV

And are treated to the magnificence of the interior…

Inside The Cathedral - image: AV

Inside The Cathedral – image: AV

Here is an excerpt from a story that I wrote about Peruvian tourism:

We reached the far end of the second beach and the cliff opened, waves could be seen on yet a third beach.

 

Shoes and socks removed, trousers rolled up and we timed our entrance to match the tidal fluctuations, before stepping into the dark. Wrong… most of us still got wet, nature can be so unpredictable, we were wet to the crotch, women squealed and the men cursed as we stepped into the cave, it opened out to a huge natural cavern. Inside a small shingle beach covered in flotsam, waves crashing, their thunder magnified by the cavernous maw to echo in our ears.

 

This was “The Cathedral,” quite spectacular.

 

From the high entrance we were treated to the sunny view of the third beach and towering cliffs. The breakers pounding over a rocky shelf at the entrance to send up temendous fountains a of spray and massive clouds of mist hung in the air.

 

The swell of the tide gave us an insight into the immense power, that she is able to move such great quantities of water. The bloated carcase of a sealion rose and fell with her undulations like a great lifeless ballon. Bouncing off the rocks, being dragged away by the ebb only to be thrust again at nature’s whim cruelly against the rocks.

 

I was left wandering what would become of this hapless creature, this vision of nature’s uglier side as I picture, somewhat morbidly, the putrefying remains of the animal and the stench that would be offered to future tourists inside our cavern.

 

I shuddered at the thought and found myself at the entrance and followed the rest of the group into the bright, almost blinding sunlight after the dimness of the cavern. I left the morbid thoughts in the cathedral, trudged back along the beach, over the promontory, up the steep track to the cliff top, into the van and along the bumpy road.

So there you have it, the thoughts of a tourist guide.

I visited The Cathedral many times with tourists, so it is with a fondness that I remember it; until this morning.

I didn’t know, but the earthquake in the region destroyed towns like Chincha, Pisco and Playa El Chaco in 2007, it also destroyed The Cathedral.

Destroyed, the awesome cavern, gone - image: flickr

Destroyed, the awesome cavern, gone – image: flickr

No more will tourists be able to gaze in awe inside The Cathedral.

My fondness for this region comes not only from my work, but later I lived in Playa El Chaco and worked in Pisco.

Sadness determines that I say, Later.

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